Local Grad Maureen Magarity Promoted




The following article on women's basketball asociate head coach Maureen Magarity appeared in the Poughkeepsie Journal on August 15 and was written by Sean McMann.


The journey that began in a gymnasium on Poughkeepsie's Boardman Road more than a dozen years ago continued in Orange County on Friday.

That's when the U.S. Military Academy at West Point announced Maureen Magarity, a 1999 graduate of Our Lady of Lourdes High School who graduated from Marist College in 2004, had been promoted to associate head coach of its women's basketball team.

"It's been such a great experience these last four years," Magarity, who joined the Black Knights prior to the 2006-07 season, told the Poughkeepsie Journal from her family's beach house in Delaware. "Oh, my gosh! I feel like I just got out of college. It's been really gratifying."

With the promotion, Magarity becomes the top assistant under her father, Dave Magarity, who became Army's head coach following the 2005-06 campaign when then-head coach Maggie Dixon passed away suddenly at the age of 28.

Formerly the head men's coach at Marist for 18 years, Dave Magarity said he couldn't have been prouder of his daughter and the accomplishments she's achieved.

"She's worked awfully hard," said the elder Magarity, who lauded his daughter for helping him make the transition to the women's game when he took the Army reins. "I credit her for really helping bring me along. When I came along here, I'd never really recruited women or coached women. God, I rely on her so heavily to do everything."

Starred at Lourdes
Seemingly born into the game, Maureen Magarity became a local star during her high school tenure with the Lourdes Warriors before making her mark on the collegiate level.

On the way to both a state Class B championship and Player of the Year honors as a senior at Lourdes, the 6-foot-2 forward scored 1,485 points and pulled down 855 rebounds in four years with the Warriors.

Magarity took her game to Boston College but was injured as a freshman and soon transferred to Marist, playing two-and-a-half seasons with the Red Foxes. At Marist, she scored 904 points, grabbed 369 rebounds and and handed out 141 assists. She was twice a second-team, all-conference selection, a co-captain her final two seasons with the Red Foxes and helped Marist reach its first-ever NCAA tournament as a senior.

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After graduating with her bachelor's degree in communications and public relations, Magarity joined head coach Brian Giorgis' staff at Marist while she pursued her master's degree in public administration.

 

"First and foremost, she was an intelligent player. You knew that would carry over into coaching," said Giorgis, who also coached Magarity at Lourdes. "She had all the tools to become an excellent coach.

"Back then, it was more of the position. She helped out with (players in) the post. She did film exchange and then helped with recruiting."

When his daughter took that first job with the Red Foxes as an assistant, Dave Magarity said it was a good test for her.

"When she made the decision to stay with Brian after she finished, back in '04, I didn't know if she had a true passion to do this," the Magarity patriarch said. "I didn't want to push her."

Instead, the coaching veteran watched his daughter grow as a person and as an assistant under Giorgis, laying the foundation for the next five-plus years, including a stint at Fairfield.

"They had such a great relationship," Dave Magarity said. "I think that really gave her a real taste of it."

And that "true passion" for coaching? Maureen Magarity said it's firmly ingrained in her.

"I truly love it," said the 28-year-old, whose Black Knights are 61-30 since the Magaritys joined the Army staff. "We've been pretty successful, so that helps. But even in the tougher years, you work harder.

"I can't think of doing anything else."

Being the daughter of a Div. I coach, Maureen Magarity said, made her both appreciate the profession and understand the duties - both on and off the court - that come with it.

"Just growing up around the game and seeing the ins and outs of coaching," she said, "that played a huge role in making me want to be a coach. I didn't jump into this not knowing what it's all about."

Still, her career choice raised at least one eyebrow in the Magarity household.

"My mom still thinks I'm crazy," Maureen Magarity said, laughing. "She said, 'Why would you want to get into this?' "

(3 of 3)


Nowadays, though, no one questions the decision.

 

Being a coach at Army, Maureen Magarity said, is a continuous learning experience, with her father giving her and her colleagues plenty of chances to grow.

"He's coached for so many years, he gives his assistants a lot of freedom and responsibility," she said. "Even during a game, he'll turn to you and ask, 'Hey, what do you think we should do?' You don't get a lot of that as a young assistant."

Having mentored dozens of his former players who have gone into coaching -"It's a pretty good number," he said -Giorgis said Magarity's promotion should lead to "bigger and better things" for her.

"She's well beyond her age, as far as coaching ability goes," Giorgis said of the younger Magarity, who was a finalist for Manhattan's head-coaching vacancy this past spring. "I think her career will take off."

More than just the next step in her blossoming career, Friday's promotion gives Maureen Magarity even more of a chance to bond with her father, sharing the game they both love, she said.

"It's really been a dream come true," she said of spending time with her father on the Black Knights' bench. "It's a special relationship. We're best friends."

After graduating with her bachelor's degree in communications and public relations, Magarity joined head coach Brian Giorgis' staff at Marist while she pursued her master's degree in public administration.

"First and foremost, she was an intelligent player. You knew that would carry over into coaching," said Giorgis, who also coached Magarity at Lourdes. "She had all the tools to become an excellent coach.

"Back then, it was more of the position. She helped out with (players in) the post. She did film exchange and then helped with recruiting."

When his daughter took that first job with the Red Foxes as an assistant, Dave Magarity said it was a good test for her.

"When she made the decision to stay with Brian after she finished, back in '04, I didn't know if she had a true passion to do this," the Magarity patriarch said. "I didn't want to push her."

Instead, the coaching veteran watched his daughter grow as a person and as an assistant under Giorgis, laying the foundation for the next five-plus years, including a stint at Fairfield.

"They had such a great relationship," Dave Magarity said. "I think that really gave her a real taste of it."

And that "true passion" for coaching? Maureen Magarity said it's firmly ingrained in her.

"I truly love it," said the 28-year-old, whose Black Knights are 61-30 since the Magaritys joined the Army staff. "We've been pretty successful, so that helps. But even in the tougher years, you work harder.

"I can't think of doing anything else."

Being the daughter of a Div. I coach, Maureen Magarity said, made her both appreciate the profession and understand the duties - both on and off the court - that come with it.

"Just growing up around the game and seeing the ins and outs of coaching," she said, "that played a huge role in making me want to be a coach. I didn't jump into this not knowing what it's all about."

Still, her career choice raised at least one eyebrow in the Magarity household.

"My mom still thinks I'm crazy," Maureen Magarity said, laughing. "She said, 'Why would you want to get into this?' "

(3 of 3)


Nowadays, though, no one questions the decision.

 

Being a coach at Army, Maureen Magarity said, is a continuous learning experience, with her father giving her and her colleagues plenty of chances to grow.

"He's coached for so many years, he gives his assistants a lot of freedom and responsibility," she said. "Even during a game, he'll turn to you and ask, 'Hey, what do you think we should do?' You don't get a lot of that as a young assistant."

Having mentored dozens of his former players who have gone into coaching -"It's a pretty good number," he said -Giorgis said Magarity's promotion should lead to "bigger and better things" for her.

"She's well beyond her age, as far as coaching ability goes," Giorgis said of the younger Magarity, who was a finalist for Manhattan's head-coaching vacancy this past spring. "I think her career will take off."

More than just the next step in her blossoming career, Friday's promotion gives Maureen Magarity even more of a chance to bond with her father, sharing the game they both love, she said.

"It's really been a dream come true," she said of spending time with her father on the Black Knights' bench. "It's a special relationship. We're best friends."

Nowadays, though, no one questions the decision.

Being a coach at Army, Maureen Magarity said, is a continuous learning experience, with her father giving her and her colleagues plenty of chances to grow.

"He's coached for so many years, he gives his assistants a lot of freedom and responsibility," she said. "Even during a game, he'll turn to you and ask, 'Hey, what do you think we should do?' You don't get a lot of that as a young assistant."

Having mentored dozens of his former players who have gone into coaching -"It's a pretty good number," he said -Giorgis said Magarity's promotion should lead to "bigger and better things" for her.

"She's well beyond her age, as far as coaching ability goes," Giorgis said of the younger Magarity, who was a finalist for Manhattan's head-coaching vacancy this past spring. "I think her career will take off."

More than just the next step in her blossoming career, Friday's promotion gives Maureen Magarity even more of a chance to bond with her father, sharing the game they both love, she said.

"It's really been a dream come true," she said of spending time with her father on the Black Knights' bench. "It's a special relationship. We're best friends."


 

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